The Top 6 Most Expensive Cars Ever Sold At Auction

1957 Ferrari 335 S

This is a 1957 Ferrari 335 S…. and it is worth an unbelievable amount of money. Seriously, it’s ridiculous. When the Ferrari goes under the hammer on February 5th, it has the potential to climb all the way to £25 million!

For all that money you would not just be buying a 1957 Ferrari 335 S, but also a piece of Ferrari Motorsport history. Only four of these cars were ever made, and it reached a top speed of 186 MPH. According to Artcurial, the auction house selling the vehicle, this specific car set a lap record at the legendary 1957 Le Mans 24 hour race and also won the 1958 Cuba Grand Prix. Artcurial describe it as “one of the most important Ferraris in the history of motorsport.”

If the Ferrari manages to reach those lofty figures it will become the most expensive car ever sold at auction. However, it will not come easy Ferrari, the current chart toppers have all sold for astronomical prices. This list will outline the top 6 vehicles that the 335 S will have to be overcome to be crowned ‘The Most Expensive Car Ever Sold At Auction.’

6. 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider

Price: $18.5m (£12.2m at today’s exchange rate)

One of 59 rare classics that were sold at auction after being found in a barn last year, this California Spider was once owned by French actor Alain Delon, who was photographed in it with Jane Fonda and Shirley MacLaine.

5. 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale

Price: $26.4m (£17.4m at today’s exchange rate)

Ferrari built just three of these cars, each with lightweight aluminium bodywork and a 316bhp 3.2-litre V12 engine.

4. 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S NART Spider

Steve McQueens ferrari

Price: $27.5m (£18.2m at today’s exchange rate)

Only 10 Ferrari 275s were built in open-top, Spider configuration, following a direct request from Ferrari’s North American importer at the time, Luigi Chinetti. The car that went for $27.5m was driven by Steve McQueen in The Thomas Crown Affair.

3. 1956 Ferrari 290 MM

Ferrari 290mm

Price: $28m (19.4m at today’s exchange rate)

The 1956 Ferrari 290 MM, chassis 0626 was built for Formula One racing legend Juan Manuel Fangio. The car was specially designed for the five-time F1 world champion and was one of only four 290 MMs to be built. It has never crashed despite a racing career that lasted until 1964.

2. 1954 Mercedes W196

1954 Mercedes W196

Price: $29.6m (£19.5m at today’s exchange rate) 

The one car in the top 10 that isn’t a Ferrari is this Mercedes W196. Raced by five-time World Champion Juan Manuel Fangio, it won a number of Grand Prixs and sold for a then world record price during the Bonhams Goodwood Festival of Speed auction in 2013.

1. 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO

Price: $38.1m (£25.1m at today’s exchange rate) 

The 250 GTO was designed to race. But while competition rules stipulated that 100 examples had to be built, Ferrari somehow got away with making only 39. This rarity combined with the GTO’s beauty and success as a racer to make it the most valuable Ferrari – indeed, the most valuable car – ever sold at auction…. for now.

James Woods – DD Classics

DD Classics Ferrari 250 GT Drogo Speciale LHD

Currently available to view in our London showroom is a stunning 1963 Ferrari 250GT Drogo Speciale.

 

DD Classics – Exclusive Classic Car Dealers in London
DD Classics are an independent Sports, Performance and Classic Car Dealer in London, selling a range of classic and modern Ferrari’s, Bentley’s, Porsche’s,Rolls-Royce’s and many more iconic cars.
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